Health & Wellness Trends to Give a Try in 2017

Let’s face it: it’s hard to start a new year off without at least thinking a little bit about resolutions. Perhaps unsurprisingly, a survey conducted by the Marist College Institute for Public Opinion showed that exercising more, weight loss, improving health and eating healthier were among the top resolutions among Americans. But is doing the same old workout and counting calories the only way to do that?

According to experts, no. In fact, there are a lot of trends happening right now to help people keep their resolutions in a variety of ways.

Katie Patch

Katie Patch, ATC

Athletic Trainer and Healthy Lifestyle Coach, Katie Patch shared that one of the most significant trends in the fitness industry are activity trackers.

An ever-growing segment of the population uses them to count steps or calories, monitor heart rates, sleep patterns and, of course, activity. Most users wear their devices 24/7, and there seems to be no end to the information that can be reported. In addition to the stats it tracks, a wearable device seems to keep health and fitness on the brain. Katie says preliminary studies have shown that those who consistently use such devices tend to have a lower Body Mass Index (BMI) than those who do not.

While fitness trackers are more high-tech than ever, Katie notes that trends in exercise are getting simpler.

Using your body weight for training continues to grow in popularity and is exactly what it sounds like–using your body weight as resistance. Pushups, squats and pull-ups are all examples of these kinds of simple, but very effective, training options.

Other simple or even “throwback” classes include outdoor fitness, which can be as low-key as going for a walk. Aerobics and dance classes are also making a return, as the only thing that’s required are comfortable clothes and some music to get everyone moving.A multi-ethnic group of young and senior adults working out in an aerobic exercise bike class at a gym or health club facility.

Katie reports additional trends as compiled by the American College of Sports Medicine include:

  • High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT): short periods of high-intensity activity with short periods of rest. Most workouts are usually short in overall duration
  • Strength Training: any form of fitness involving strengthening of the body, such as the use of weight machines, free weights or strength band exercises
  • Personal Training: gaining personal instruction in form and body mechanics tailored to individuals
  • Group Training: this includes not only gym-based offerings such as Pilates, Spin, or Yoga, but also informal exercise “classes” organized between friends
  • Exercise as Medicine: primary care providers including physical fitness plans as part of treatment plans

As with exercise, there are also trends relating to how—and what—people are eating to improve their health and wellness.

Liane Vadheim

Liane Vadheim, RD

“Many people are moving away from packaged foods that have a list of ingredients that are unrecognizable,” says Liane Vadheim, a registered dietitian with Holy Rosary Healthcare. “They’re ‘coming home’ to foods that are more wholesome, things that are minimally processed and that look like something their great-grandparents would have thought of as food.”

Montanans, Liane notes, have the chance to take advantage of the trend towards “locavorism,” which promotes choosing as many foods as possible within a 100-mile radius. Our state’s diverse agricultural heritage provides plenty of access to whole grains, legumes, vegetables, fruits, eggs, dairy and locally-produced meat. She says this also supports the opportunity to enjoy a colorful diet full of nutrient-dense, phytochemical-rich foods such as beets, peppers and tomatoes.

“There are some people who are moving to more of a plant-based diet,” says Liane. “Of course, animal protein can still be part of a healthy diet, but people are willing to experiment more with beans, lentils, nuts and seeds.”

That includes, she says, “sprouting.” The sprouting process changes the nutrient content of seeds, nuts, grains and beans, increasing fiber and decreasing starches. It’s most often used in breads and crackers, with new products arriving on the market.

Just as there is a trend towards fitness being used as part of medicine, nutrition is as well. According to Liane, there are a variety of foods that improve health, such as:

  • Spicy foods, which can help in lowering “bad” cholesterol and boost hormone production, counteracting the effects of stress
  • Foods which are natural anti-inflammatories, such as tomatoes, berries, nuts, olive oil, leafy greens and fatty fish, just to name a few. Turmeric, ginger, paprika and other spices are also a natural way to reduce inflammationHigh angle point of view of female hands cutting Portobello mushrooms. Various fresh and healthy vegetables are on wooden table. Woman is cooking food. She is domestic kitchen.
  • Good fats” from salmon, almonds and avocados are now included as “healthy” in the newest Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Yogurts and cheese, consumed in moderation, are also making their way off the “naughty” list

Liane recognizes that making the right food choices can be difficult for people who are just getting started. This is particularly true, she says, for people who may be overweight and at risk for heart disease or type 2 diabetes.

“For those at risk who really want to begin the process of long-term change, I would encourage them to sign up for the Healthy Lifestyles Program through Holy Rosary,” she says. “It’s offered twice yearly, and the first session for 2017 gets underway later this month.”

The Healthy Lifestyles program, which has been recognized by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is based on a medically guided program that helps participants make long-term, sustainable changes. It consists of one-on-one sessions with a trained lifestyle coach, periodic assessments, personalized goal setting, a 16-week core program with weekly educational and exercise sessions and 6-month follow-up program with classes, assessments, and coaching sessions.

“We’ve seen participants achieve so much success in this program, including losing weight, lowering cholesterol and being more physical mobile,” Liane says. “And that’s a trend we look forward to seeing continue.”

Enrollment ends January 23 for the spring 2017 Session, call 406-233-4067 for complete details.

HRH Enhances Patient Safety Through New Technology

Holy Rosary Healthcare is committed to enhancing the safety of every patient, including those who undergo surgical procedures. That’s why the organization is pleased to announce the adoption of radio frequency identification (RFID) within the surgical department. The first RFID-enhanced surgery at Holy Rosary Healthcare was completed in spring 2016, and all subsequent surgeries have incorporated RFID use.

RFID technology utilizes a small microchip tightly embedded within every surgical sponge. Before the surgery incision is closed, the surgical team electronically scans the patient to verify that no sponges were left inside the patient, in addition to the manual sponge count conducted during the procedure. If the scanner detects a device within the patient, another sponge count is conducted and the patient rescanned. If the detection technology does not find any sponges, and the manual count is accurate, the surgery incision can be stitched and the surgical procedure may end.

HRH Surgery Team uses RFID to check a patient.

HRH Surgery Team uses RFID to check a patient.

“Although Holy Rosary Healthcare has never had case involving a retained sponge, this added technology can continue to ensure that record continues,” says Director of Surgical Services, Gary Hamilton. “It is a significant benefit for the patients we serve.”

According to Chief Nursing Officer Carol Enderle, the importance of proper sponge counting and removal of sponges cannot be understated. Failure to do so can result in infection and other significant post-surgical difficulties.

“If we can assure every patient will be provided with quality care, then I stand behind this technology,” she says. “Part of the mission and values of Holy Rosary Healthcare and SCL Health is to ensure excellence. This technology will assist with our continued efforts as a surgery team to provide the best care to our patients.”

“This a technology not always available to facilities the size of Holy Rosary,” agrees Hamilton. “We especially appreciate the efforts of CEO Paul Lewis, our Board of Directors, and SCL Health in ensuring we—and our patients—have access to it.”

SCL Health Hospitals Implement Illuminating Vein-Finding Technology, Improve Patient Comfort

From a newborn in the nursery to a 90-year-old in the surgery department, IV starts and blood draws are performed on a wide range of patients every day at Holy Rosary Healthcare. But even the most experienced healthcare professional can have difficulty accessing veins safely and quickly the first time.

DeAmbra Barrows, Same Day Surgery RN, uses AccuVein to locate a vein on a patient.

DeAmbra Barrows, Same Day Surgery RN, uses AccuVein to locate a vein on a patient.

With patient comfort and care as top priorities at Holy Rosary Healthcare and St. Vincent Healthcare, both SCL Health hospitals, are excited to bring vein illumination technology to Miles City and Billings. AccuVein, a small handheld device about the size of a T.V. remote, will help reduce the number of needle sticks to patients for blood draws and intravenous treatments.

“We’re always striving to create the best possible experience for our patients and this technology will decrease their discomfort with IV starts and lab draws, particularly if they historically have difficult access,” said Holy Rosary Healthcare Vice President of Patient Care Services and Chief Nursing Officer Carol Enderle, DNP, APRN-BC. “Plus, our nurses will greatly benefit from this technology. The visual guidance will not only improve their IV skills, which are an essential part of the bedside nurse’s role, but also their competence and confidence overall. It’s a win-win for everyone!”

AccuVein uses infrared light, projected onto a patient’s arm, to reveal a map of peripheral veins on the skin’s surface. The AccuVein device has been shown to improve first stick success by 350-percent, reduce pain by up to 59-percent and reduce procedure time by 78-percent.

Enhancing the Patient Experience, Holy Rosary’s MedSurg Project

On Friday, June 24, Holy Rosary Healthcare celebrated the completion of a construction project that began a year ago with collaborative conversations among patients, physicians, nurses, and leadership to create an ideal care environment for hospitalized patients and culminated in the opening of the new Medical-Surgical (MedSurg) Department.

“Our primary goal was to enhance patient experience,” says Jackie Muri, the project leader from Holy Rosary. “We had a wonderful team involved with this very collaborative project. We recognized the value of the insights from those who receive care and use the space daily, so we engaged a representative panel of people to share their insights about their experiences and their ideas of how the space would be ideal.”

Pauline Flotkoetter, MSN, RN and MedSurg Staff pose in the new MedSurg Bariatric Suite with the new bed, lift, and other equipment to help move patients and receive care safely.

Pauline Flotkoetter, MSN, RN and MedSurg Staff pose in the new MedSurg Bariatric Suite with the new bed, lift, and other equipment to help move patients and receive care safely.

Eliciting feedback from all key stakeholders, she notes, was a critical part of the process. It began with a series of meetings with Holy Rosary medical staff, nurses, physical therapists, lab and radiology technicians, associates, and leaders who provide patient care in the MedSurg area.

“It was about seeking the voice of the customer, and it helped us to identify all of the high-value opportunities available to us,” Muri explains. “We asked them to tell us what a great patient experience would look and feel like; we also asked for their help in prioritizing the opportunities that fit within our project budget and aligned with our overall project goals.”

“It was a great process,” agrees Holy Rosary Healthcare President and CEO Paul Lewis. “By having the opportunity to bring a lot of our staff together in the early phases we developed a pattern for optimal care. It is a huge success in terms of being able to take an existing space, remodel and it and create something that is better for patients. Our staff made that possible.”

That included evaluating not only looking at “big picture” items such as making the area more modern and welcoming, but also minute details, such as making all flooring seamless to eliminate noise. Bedside charting, which allows nurses and other health care providers to document patient interactions, was also instituted as part of the project.

“This allows increases accessibility and the time nurses and other caregivers spend directly with the patient and to openly dialogue with patients while entering the information directly into the medical chart immediately” says Muri. “They can ask clarifying questions right then, which supports more thorough and accurate documentation and further enhances care.”

According to Pauline Flotkoetter, MSN, RN, MedSurg, OB and Swing Bed Nurse Manager, the department is generally staffed by two nurses, a certified nursing assistant and a ward clerk at any given time.

“They love it,” she says. “It’s an easy area to work in. Because the staff was so involved in the design and planning phases, it has allowed us to focus on patient-centered care.”

That includes, Flotkoetter notes, Transitioning the unit to primarily private patient rooms, which is a significant patient and family satisfier.

“We now have eleven rooms; nine of them are private patient rooms and two are doubles,” she says. “That has made a big difference in how we care for patients. Orthopedic patients, for example, have so much equipment and if family members were visiting there was limited available space to comfortably accommodate everything. Now it’s very spacious, and an overall more comfortable experience for patients.”

Another significant update in terms of patient care was the inclusion of a bariatric room, designed exclusively for patients with limited mobility constraints and/or patients.

“We want to help all patients receive the care they need and to be comfortable in the process,” explains Vice President of Patient Care Services and Chief Nursing Officer Carol Enderle, DNP, APRN-BC. “The bariatric room allows us to manage patients weighing up to 500 pounds, with a bed, lift, and other equipment that allows us to help them move and receive care safely.”

Enderle says, “Just as we want to ensure our patients are safe, we also want our staff to be safe in the way they’re caring for patients.”

“We hadn’t been able to deliver care at this level for bariatric patients previously,” says Muri. “Now we have a dedicated suite, equipped with excellent equipment, and our 100% of our MedSurg nursing staff is fully trained on how to provide the best care to bariatric patients.”

Pauline Flotkoetter, MSN, RN, MedSurg, OB and Swing Bed Nurse Manager demonstrates the new lift in the bariatric suite to guests during the open house.

Pauline Flotkoetter, MSN, RN, MedSurg, OB and Swing Bed Nurse Manager demonstrates the new lift in the bariatric suite to guests during the open house.

Paul Lewis calls the inclusion of the bariatric room—and the project as a whole—a great investment for patients and the staff who care for them.

“We are the central location for the majority of patient care for Miles City and the surrounding area,” he says. “This is an extension of that care, one that allows us to better care for our community.”

Additional project enhancements include a redesigned nurse and physician work station to support patient interaction, a nutrition center for patients and guests, and a private bath suite for utilization by any patient in the unit.

He and Muri not only credit the many staff members involved with the project, but also the community for their support. Lewis says he and the staff at Holy Rosary Healthcare were pleased to have the opportunity to extend our thanks.

“It was wonderful to see the support of our community,” he notes. “We recognize it is key to our success and our viability.”

“This project was made possible in large part thanks to hospital capital and reinvestment,” Muri says. “But it is also an example of the power of philanthropy and the support of our community, which allowed us to take make this project truly exceptional now and in the future. We have an amazing team of providers, nurses and caregivers who love their work and are committed to great patient care. Collectively, this results in a truly differentiated patient experience.”

St. Vincent and Holy Rosary implement illuminating vein-finding technology, improve patient comfort

From a newborn in the neonatal intensive care unit to a 90-year-old in the emergency department, IV starts and blood draws are performed on a wide range of patients every day at St. Vincent Healthcare. But even the most experienced healthcare professional can have difficulty accessing veins safely and quickly the first time.

With patient comfort and care as top priorities at St. Vincent Healthcare and Holy Rosary Healthcare, both SCL Health hospitals are excited to bring vein illumination technology to Billings and Miles City. AccuVein, a small handheld device about the size of a T.V. remote, will help reduce the number of needle sticks to patients for blood draws and intravenous treatments.

AccuVein“We’re always striving to create the best possible experience for our patients and this will decrease their discomfort with the IV starts and lab draws, particularly if they historically have difficult access,” said St. Vincent Healthcare Director of Nursing, Vicki Birkeland. “Plus, our nurses will greatly benefit from this technology. The visual guidance will not only improve their IV skills, which are an essential part of the bedside nurse’s role, but also their competence and confidence overall. It’s a win-win for everyone!”

AccuVein uses infrared light, projected onto a patient’s arm, to reveal a map of peripheral veins on the skin’s surface. The AccuVein device has been shown to improve first stick success by 350-percent, reduce pain by up to 59-percent and reduce procedure time by 78-percent.

Footage illustrating how the vein illuminator works is available at: http://www.accuvein.com/products/video-gallery/

Where We’re Headed: An Update on Growth in Our Montana Region

Tajquah Hudson, Chief Strategy and Business Development Officer

SCL Health’s Chief Strategy and Business Development Officer, Tajquah Hudson, SVP, recently shared an update on growth in the Montana region to SCL Health associates.

So what was the scoop? St. Vincent and Holy Rosary have a combined market share of 43%, serving more patients than any other organization in the region, and St. James is the sole hospital provider in Silver Bow County, serving nearly 85% of PSA inpatients.

St. Vincent’s Frontier Cancer Center acquisition continues to exceed targets. “They acquired Frontier Cancer Center some time ago,” said Hudson. “It’s a major oncology provider, and it’s continuing to grow across the state.”

She pointed out that SCL Health is working to integrate its successful telehealth network across the state, with a special focus on emergency and oncology care.

HRH_6271_rev“Montana has had a very strong telehealth network for a long time,” she said. “It’s a very rural state, so people (have to) drive a long way for care. That’s why it’s important for us to provide access to these services.”

Additionally, SCL Health is assessing opportunities in home health and post-acute care services and partnerships with rural health providers.

Click here to see Hudson’s update on growth in our Colorado markets.

Providing Care to Eastern MT Athletes

Story written by SCL Health Communications intern Julissa Marie Talkington

Spring sports are underway and whether athletes are stepping foot on the court, track, field or mat, Eastern Montana athletes always give their best to represent their schools, families and communities. That’s why Holy Rosary Healthcare is pleased to have the opportunity to give them the best support and medical care available—and why the organization has spent March celebrating National Athletic Training Month.

team1_mid

Katie, Amy & Rob, HRH’s Athletic Trainers.

Rob Brugger, director of the Holy Rosary Healthcare Therapy team, started offering sports medicine assistance in 1999 when he saw a demand for it in the community. The program has continued to grow to include dedicated, licensed athletic trainers, Amy Tooke and Katie Patch of Miles City.

“I can’t stress enough how thankful I am to have two incredible women like Amy and Katie as part of our team,” he says. “We truly could not do this without them. Their hard work and focused mentality have helped us keep this program going strong.”

Amy wraps ,CCDHS athlete, Amanda Beard's ankle to prevent injury.

Amy wraps, CCDHS athlete, Amanda Beard’s ankle to prevent injury.

Along with attending athletic events, as part of relationships with Custer County District High School (CCDHS) and Miles Community College (MCC), Tooke and Patch provide free athletic training sessions to public school and collegiate athletes from Miles City and surrounding areas through HRH’s Training Room program. During the school year, the Training Room program allows student athlete’s access to HRH’s athletic trainers for injury prevention, evaluation and treatment recommendations at no charge on Tuesdays and Thursday 8-10 am.

Tooke, who has been a trainer in the community for 11 years, says giving athletes the support they need often means long hours, but her job is something she enjoys.

“Helping someone get better after they have an accident is incredibly rewarding,” she says. “You get to see athletes at their worst when they are not only physically strained, but emotionally strained as well. We become determined with them to get them back into their active lifestyle as quickly and as safely as possible.”

Katie check MCC Pioneer Baseball player, Chance Lujan, for an elbow injury.

Katie checks MCC Pioneer Baseball player, Chance Lujan, for an elbow injury.

Though newer to the athletic training team, Patch says her time with them has been an excellent experience thus far. “You hate seeing injuries but watching someone heal is incredibly fulfilling,” she says.

National Athletic Training Month is held in March to raise awareness about all that athletic trainers do. During this annual observance, athletic trainers are recognized for to injury prevention and for their dedication to helping those they serve stay healthy and active. For more information about the athletic training services available through Holy Rosary Healthcare, please visit www.holyrosaryhealthcare.org or call 406-233-2719.

Little Boy Makes “Big” Donation to Dentistry Program

Eathans Note“Dear Holy Rosary Foundation,” the note begins in a young boy’s careful handwriting. “Thank you for giving kids a chance to go to the dentist. Here is my savings of $8.52. It could help buy [a] toothbrush.”

While some children might be wary of visiting the dentist, to many others, it is a privilege that their family simply cannot afford. That is why, when young Eathan emptied out his piggy bank, the carefully saved dollars and cents were headed toward the Holy Rosary Healthcare Foundation’s Smile Savers Program.

As he requested, Eathan’s donation did go towards toothbrushes, and it was not alone. He is just one in a network of community members, donors and SCL Health associates working together to provide dental work and cleanings to underserved children in the community. This program, known as Smile Savers, cares for thousands of local children who would otherwise be unable to receive dental care.

SmileSavers_2

A young child receives a dental cleaning as part of the HRH Smile Savers program.

“The Holy Rosary Healthcare Foundation works with the Ronald McDonald Care Mobile out of St. Vincent to hold free dental clinics for children ages 1 -17 who are enrolled in Medicaid, Healthy Montana Kids, or simply don’t have dental insurance,” explains Jackie Muri, Executive Director of the Holy Rosary Foundation. “Approximately 74 percent of children in Montana don’t have dental insurance. We have been able to care for nearly 2000 kids since the program began in 2005.”

SmileSavers_1

Care is provided by the Ronald McDonald Care Mobile, in partnership with St. Vincent Healthcare.

The Smile Savers program provides services from dental assistants, hygienists and a certified dentist. It also equips each child with the tools and education needed to maintain good dental hygiene. Each child receives a toothbrush, floss, mouthwash and a timer. While the Holy Rosary Foundation supports nearly 70 different projects, Smile Savers is especially important to this rural community, where some children travel more than 100 miles to visit the Care Mobile. Contributions come in large and small, including from young children like Eathan who want to ensure that their friends, neighbors and classmates continue smiling brightly.

“These children most likely wouldn’t have received care any other way,” says Muri. “This speaks to the heart of our mission – to address this unmet need in our community and serve those who need it the most.”

 

HRH Lab Refreshes Waiting Room

Have you seen the new artwork in the Lab Waiting Room? You will never guess who took the pictures? Our own HRH Lab Staff! A conversation regarding the number of amateur photographers in the lab lead to this great project. Each staff member or their close family members submitted the photos.hrhlab_2

Check out the pictures of the new photos displayed in the lab here or stop by!

Here is a list of what was submitted:

  • Taken by Jason the storm and the deer & storm over Miles City
  • Taken by Ed the moon
  • Taken by Coleen the squirrels and her son handmade the frames.
  • Taken by Barb A the river
  • Taken by Barb H eagles and the little kid
  • Taken by Mary L the rose
  • Taken by Kristi the coneflower
  • Taken by Ashlee’s husband the two sunset pictures
  • Taken by Leslie’s dad the winter scene

Meet Sam & Maggie

Story written by SCL Health Communications intern Julissa Marie Talkington

sammaggie3Have you seen a dog walking the halls of Holy Rosary Healthcare? Meet U.S. Army veteran Sam Schultz, HRH Patient Access Registration Specialist and his dog Maggie.

In 2011, Sam served with the 172nd in Germany and was deployed to Afghanistan in 2011 as an Infantryman which is the land based-based combat force sometimes referred to as the military’s backbone.  As with many veterans serving in a combat zone, Sam was diagnosed with PTSD, or post-traumatic stress disorder, after returning to Fort Knox.  While in Kentucky, he made the decision to get a service dog to help with his anxiety and was able to adopt Maggie, a terrier/schnauzer mix. Maggie underwent three months of service training in Ohio and then Sam spent an additional three months training Maggie as his companion.

As a service dog, Maggie plays a very important role for Sam. She is trained to sense when Sam is feeling anxious in high-stress situations or overwhelmed in public places such as the mall or busy conferences. If Maggie senses stress, she will nuzzle and lick Sam to divert his attention from whatever situation is causing him discomfort.

Maggie has become a pro at her job in a variety of places and situations, and joins Sam at the HRH for his shifts. She loves the environment andsammaggie4 thinks it is very friendly; however, she will become a little anxious herself if she’s away from Sam and becomes worried she isn’t doing her job. Although she loves all of the smiles and attention she receives from guests and associates, it’s important to remember to ask before approaching or engaging with Maggie.

We are proud to have both Sam and Maggie as valuable members of our Holy Rosary Healthcare team!